Are you Having Dessert for Breakfast?

breakfast-cereal-sugary-truth_0

Why your healthy “whole grain” choice might be equivalent to dessert in a bowl.

Cereal is often the number one go-to breakfast choice for parents, considering it takes a mere 30 seconds to throw together and serve, and it is widely accepted by kids. After all, it’s crunchy, fun to eat, and often sweet. In fact, cereal is a lot sweeter than most people realize, especially those cereals that are marketed to kids. What may seem like a healthy “whole grain” choice, may actually be the equivalent to serving your kids dessert for breakfast.

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) recently conducted an analysis on over 1500 breakfast cerealsincluding 181 cereals specifically marketed to childrenand figured out that a child who eats a bowl of cereal a day for a year would end up consuming about 10 pounds of sugar from that source alone. In the document, it states that the most popular children’s cereals average about two teaspoons of sugar per serving, which is similar to three “Chips Ahoy” cookies. Over one third of the calories in a serving of children’s cereal came from sugar alone, and most of these cereals contained over a third of the recommended daily amount of sugar.

Out of the 181 cereals that were specifically marketed to kids, very few were low in sugar and there wasn’t a single one that did not contain added sugar, which clearly indicates that the manufacturers are capitalizing on children’s biologically-driven affinity for sweet foods. Not surprisingly, the EWG found that the health claims plastered all over cereal boxes (“Good source of fibre” or “Excellent source of Vitamin D”) often distracts consumers from what actually matters—the ingredients

As mentioned in the MacLeans Magazine cover story, “Death By Sugar,”  that unveils the truths about the damaging health effects of sugar, Canadians eat, on average, about 88 lbs of sugar per year. What’s more shocking is that the average 9-year-old boy eats 126 lbs of sugar per year, and the average male teen, 138 lbs. As a Dietitian, this sadly doesn’t surprise me too muchI’ve seen some fairly shocking food journals in my counseling practice, many that absolutely ooze SUGAR. Sugar appears in everything from cereal to salad dressing, and from condiments to crackers. If it comes in a package or boxeven if it claims to be healthy in some wayit likely contains added sugar.

This is why my family and I decided to cut back significantly on processed, packaged foods. We didn’t make the now-popular resolution to go “sugar-free” (because I knew that was unrealistic for us), but rather to focus on whole foods that come in their natural formfruits, veggies, intact whole grains, eggs, hormone/antibiotic-free meats, beans and lentils, etc. In doing that, we naturally cut back on our sugar consumption by A LOT. 

What draws many families to boxed cereal (among other processed, packaged foods) is the convenience factor. As a Mom to a three-year-old and 10-month-old, I get it. But I also know that what we feed our kids now will affect them long-term. As parents, we set the stage for what our kids will view as “normal” when it comes to food. If we’re constantly feeding them food from a package, they will grow accustomed to the over-powering sugary, salty tastes and perhaps not appreciate the true flavors of real food. They will grow to think that eating means opening a package or box. Cooking from scratch not only benefits our kids (and ourselves) from a nutrition stand-point, but also opens up the opportunity for kids to learn how to cook and prepare food something that will benefit them for life.

It may seem impossible to trade your favorite breakfast cereal in for something healthier, but it’s not. There are plenty of healthy-but-still-easy options out there. 

Focus on the ingredients:

If you absolutely can’t kick your cereal habit, make sure that you’re reading the ingredients list first and foremost. If sugar (or any form of sweetener, such as brown rice syrup, agave syrup, glucose, honey etc.) is one of the first 3 ingredients, put it back. If there are more than 6 or 7 ingredients total (unless they are all natural ingredients that you recognize), put it back. When looking at the nutrition facts table, aim for at least 4 grams of fibre and less than 8 grams of sugar per 30 gram serving size. Read more here about why you should always read the ingredients list on food products  and the top five ingredients to avoid.

Expand your breakfast palate:

Cold cereal isn’t the only convenient option. Hot cereal is our favorite go-to breakfast, because it’s much more filling and satisfying and the kids love it. Our favorite is slow-cooker steel-cut oats . It’s great because I can prepare it the night before, but if I forget, I’ll throw 1/3 cup rolled oats into a bowl with 2/3 cup milk and a pinch of salt, microwave on high for 2 minutes, and then add berries and a bit of maple syrup or vanilla yogurt.

A fruit smoothie is another easy but healthy option. Use milk, yogurt, nut butters, and seeds to boost the protein content for a more filling smoothie, skip the fruit juice and go easy on added sweeteners, such as honey or maple syrup. Protein-packed eggs are also an excellent breakfast option, perhaps paired with fruit and a homemade high-fibre muffin . A breakfast that includes protein has shown to help prevent unhealthy snacking later in the day.

Be realistic, but don’t be fooled:

Having cereal once in a while is not a huge deal, much the same as enjoying any treat or “fun” food. Making cereal your morning staple, however, is not healthy. Most cereals are not “health foods” as they claim, but more so sugar-ladened processed grains in a box that I consider to be “non-foods”.

Cereal is often the number one go-to breakfast choice for parents, considering it takes a mere 30 seconds to throw together and serve, and it is widely accepted by kids. After all, it’s crunchy, fun to eat, and often sweet. In fact, cereal is a lot sweeter than most people realize, especially those cereals that are marketed to kids. What may seem like a healthy “whole grain” choice, may actually be the equivalent to serving your kids dessert for breakfast.

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) recently conducted an analysis on over 1500 breakfast cerealsincluding 181 cereals specifically marketed to childrenand figured out that a child who eats a bowl of cereal a day for a year would end up consuming about 10 pounds of sugar from that source alone. In the document, it states that the most popular children’s cereals average about two teaspoons of sugar per serving, which is similar to three “Chips Ahoy” cookies. Over one third of the calories in a serving of children’s cereal came from sugar alone, and most of these cereals contained over a third of the recommended daily amount of sugar.

Out of the 181 cereals that were specifically marketed to kids, very few were low in sugar and there wasn’t a single one that did not contain added sugar, which clearly indicates that the manufacturers are capitalizing on children’s biologically-driven affinity for sweet foods. Not surprisingly, the EWG found that the health claims plastered all over cereal boxes (“Good source of fibre” or “Excellent source of Vitamin D”) often distracts consumers from what actually matters—the ingredients

As mentioned in theMacLeans Magazine cover story, “Death By Sugar,” that unveils the truths about the damaging health effects of sugar, Canadians eat, on average, about 88 lbs of sugar per year. What’s more shocking is that the average 9-year-old boy eats 126 lbs of sugar per year, and the average male teen, 138 lbs. As a Dietitian, this sadly doesn’t surprise me too muchI’ve seen some fairly shocking food journals in my counseling practice, many that absolutely ooze SUGAR. Sugar appears in everything from cereal to salad dressing, and from condiments to crackers. If it comes in a package or boxeven if it claims to be healthy in some wayit likely contains added sugar.

This is why my family and I decided to cut back significantly on processed, packaged foods last Fall. We didn’t make the now-popular resolution to go “sugar-free” (because I knew that was unrealistic for us), but rather to focus on whole foods that come in their natural formfruits, veggies, intact whole grains, eggs, hormone/antibiotic-free meats, beans and lentils, etc. In doing that, we naturally cut back on our sugar consumption by A LOT. 

What draws many families to boxed cereal (among other processed, packaged foods) is the convenience factor. As a Mom to a three-year-old and 10-month-old, I get it. But I also know that what we feed our kids now will affect them long-term. As parents, we set the stage for what our kids will view as “normal” when it comes to food. If we’re constantly feeding them food from a package, they will grow accustomed to the over-powering sugary, salty tastes and perhaps not appreciate the true flavours of real food. They will grow to think that eating means opening a package or box. Cooking from scratch not only benefits our kids (and ourselves) from a nutrition stand-point, but also opens up the opportunity for kids to learn how to cook and prepare foodsomething that will benefit them for life.

It may seem impossible to trade your favourite breakfast cereal in for something healthier, but it’s not. There are plenty of healthy-but-still-easy options out there. 

Focus on the ingredients:

If you absolutely can’t kick your cereal habit, make sure that you’re reading the ingredients list first and foremost. If sugar (or any form of sweetener, such as brown rice syrup, agave syrup, glucose, honey etc.) is one of the first 3 ingredients, put it back. If there are more than 6 or 7 ingredients total (unless they are all natural ingredients that you recognize), put it back. When looking at the nutrition facts table, aim for at least 4 grams of fibre and less than 8 grams of sugar per 30 gram serving size. Read more here about why you should always read the ingredients list on food products and the top five ingredients to avoid. 

Expand your breakfast palate:

Cold cereal isn’t the only convenient option. Hot cereal is our favourite go-to breakfast, because it’s much more filling and satisfying and the kids love it. Our favourite is slow-cooker steel-cut oats. It’s great because I can prepare it the night before, but if I forget, I’ll throw 1/3 cup rolled oats into a bowl with 2/3 cup milk and a pinch of salt, microwave on high for 2 minutes, and then add berries and a bit of maple syrup or vanilla yogurt. I also made this delicious breakfast quinoa recipe the other day and it was a huge hit.

A fruit smoothie is another easy but healthy option. Use milk, yogurt, nut butters, and seeds to boost the protein content for a more filling smoothie, skip the fruit juice and go easy on added sweeteners, such as honey or maple syrup. Protein-packed eggs are also an excellent breakfast option, perhaps paired with fruit and a homemade high-fibre muffin. A breakfast that includes protein has shown to help prevent unhealthy snacking later in the day. Here are a few more easy, healthy, kid-friendly breakfast options if you’re interested.

Be realistic, but don’t be fooled:

Having cereal once in a while is not a huge deal, much the same as enjoying any treat or “fun” food. Making cereal your morning staple, however, is not healthy. Most cereals are not “health foods” as they claim, but more so sugar-ladened processed grains in a box.

– See more at: http://www.yummymummyclub.ca/blogs/sarah-remmer-the-non-diet-dietitian/20140518/breakfast-cereal-exposed?s=Newsletter_May_24_2014&utm_source=YummyMummyClub.ca+List&utm_campaign=99956c558d-YMC_Food_May_24_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_fd9e34c143-99956c558d-11307205#sthash.GfLQYuZI.d

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The Not-So-Sweet Side of Sugar

ImageWe all know that excess sugar in our diet can cause weight gain and lead to diabetes.  But the latest research now reveals more serious effects of added sugar.  Here’s the latest article by IDEA Health & Fitness Magazine

Now there’s another reason to encourage clients to limit their sugar intake: Eating added sugar is associated with increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published February 3 online in JAMA Internal Medicine. The study focuses on sugar added in the processing or preparing of foods, not naturally occurring sugars in fruits and fruit juices.

Recommendations for added sugar consumption vary, and there is no universally accepted threshold for unhealthy levels. For example, the Institute of Medicine recommends that added sugar make up less than 25% of total calories, the World Health Organization recommends less than 10% (but in March 2014 proposed a further reduction to below 5% for additional benefits), and the American Heart Association recommends limiting added sugars to less than 100 calories daily for women and 150 calories daily for men, according to the study background.

Quanhe Yang, PhD, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in Atlanta, and colleagues used national health survey data to examine added sugar consumption as a percentage of daily calories and to estimate association between consumption and CVD.

How Much Sugar Are We Eating?

Study results indicate that the average percentage of daily calories from added sugar increased from 15.7% in 1988–1994 to 16.8% in 1999–2004, but decreased to 14.9% in 2005–2010.

In 2005–2010, most adults (71.4%) consumed 10% or more of their calories from added sugar, but for about 10% of adults it made up 25% or more of their calories.

The Risks of Too Much Sweetness

The risk of heart-related death increases 18% for people consuming an average American diet with about 15% of daily calories from added sugar, compared with those whose diets contain little to no added sugar, the study authors found.

The risk is 38% higher for people who receive 17%–21% of their calories from added sugar, and more than double for people who get more than 21% of their daily diet from added sugar, Yang said.

Laura A. Schmidt, PhD, who wrote commentary on the published research, says, “Yang . . . shows that the risk of CVD mortality becomes elevated once sugar intake surpasses 15% of daily calories—equivalent to drinking one 20-ounce Mountain Dew soda in a 2,000 calorie diet. From there, the risk rises exponentially as a function of increased sugar intake, peaking with a [400% higher] risk of CVD death for individuals who consume one-third or more calories in added sugar.”

Another key point: The study found that the added sugar that Americans consume as part of their daily diet can—on its own, regardless of other health problems—more than double the risk of death from heart disease.

“[This] new paradigm [that Yang’s research falls within] hypothesizes that sugar has adverse health effects above any purported role as ’empty calories’ promoting obesity,” notes Schmidt. “Too much sugar does not just make us fat; it can also make us sick.”

Guideline for Better Health

So what is a good general guideline for sugar consumption? “Until federal guidelines are forthcoming, physicians may want to caution patients that, to support cardiovascular health, it is safest to consume less than 15% of total calories as added sugar,” says Schmidt.

IDEA Fit Tips, Volume 12, Number 3
March 2014